Yap Wai Ming

    Email: waiming.yap@stamfordlaw.com.sg

    Address: 10 Collyer Quay, Ocean Financial Centre, Level 27

    Yap Wai Ming is admitted to both the Singapore and Malaysian bar. His main areas of practice are project finance, equity and debt capital markets (including Islamic finance), gaming and leisure. He has more than 25 years of experience in the Singapore and Malaysian corporate scenes. He is recognised as one of Asia’s leading lawyers in Mergers and Acquisitions by leading journals such as IFLR 1000, Legal 500, AsiaLaw Leading Lawyers, Best Lawyers in Singapore and Chambers Asia. He is also recognised by Chambers Global and Chambers Asia as a leading lawyer in Gaming & Gambling for Asia-Pacific. Chambers Asia describes Wai Ming as “personable, practical and a great choice for getting things done”. Wai Ming is the current Secretary General of the Inter-Pacific Bar Association, and is a registered professional acting as Sponsor to some of Singapore’s Catalist companies under the Singapore Stock Exchange. Wai Ming is the author of several articles on corporate law and gaming-related papers. He has served on the boards of public companies listed in international markets, and currently serves on the board of three charities namely Ren Ci Hospital, Tan Tock Seng Hospital Community Fund and the Singhealth Foundation. He is also the Singapore member of the International Masters of Gaming Law.

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